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Audits in progress

Audits in progress

Bullying and Harassment in Victoria’s Public Health Sector
Digital Dashboard: Status Review of ICT Projects and Initiatives Phase 2
Grants to non-government schools
Local Government Service Delivery: Recreational Services
Managing and Reporting on the Performance and Cost of Capital Projects
Patient Safety in Victorian Hospitals
Public Safety on Victoria's Train System
Reducing the Burden of Red Tape
Victorian Electoral Commission

Public Safety on Victoria's Train's System

Public transport services, and in particular trains, play a significant role in connecting people to a range of social and economic opportunities such as employment, education and services. Passengers should feel safe as they use these services regardless of the time of day or night. In 2011, the former government committed $212 million over four years to recruit 940 Protective Services Officers (PSOs) for deployment at 212 metropolitan rail stations and four regional stations, every night from 6 pm until after the last train. This was intended to deter crime, violence and antisocial behaviour and improve perceptions of safety for commuters on the train system.

This audit will assess the effectiveness of the PSO program. It will consider whether PSOs have reduced crime on the Melbourne metropolitan train system and improved public perceptions of the safety of train travel, particularly at night; if Victoria Police, the Department of Justice and Regulation and Public Transport Victoria gave appropriate advice to support key decisions on the deployment of PSOs; and if governance arrangements for personal security and safety initiatives across Victoria’s train system optimally support and leverage the work of PSOs.

The report is expected to be tabled in February 2016.

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Victorian Electoral Commission

The Victorian Electoral Commission (VEC) maintains the electoral enrolment register, and conducts state, local government, statutory, commercial and community elections and boundary reviews. It is critical that the work of VEC is efficient and inspires public confidence in the electoral system process.

The objective of this audit is to assess the effectiveness, efficiency and economy of VEC in conducting the 2014 Victorian state election. The audit will examine the performance of VEC including its management of early voting, voter turnout and participation, electronically assisted voting, automatic enrolments, electronic roll mark off, and election-related infringements.

The report is expected to be tabled in February 2016.

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Grants to Non-Government Schools

The non-government school sector comprises 493 Catholic schools and 208 independent schools. Non-government schools provide education to around 334 000, or 37 per cent, of Victorian school children.

The Victorian Government funds non-government schools through a range of non-competitive grants. These grants are provided to either a recognised school system authority on behalf of systemic schools, directly to non-systemic schools or through a non-system authority in relation special purpose grants.

The main form of grant that the Victorian Government provides non-government schools is the State Recurrent Grant, which is intended to provide funding for schools to meet the recurrent costs of providing education programs consistent with Victoria’s education policies and goals. With the exception of money provided to support students with disabilities, the money is ‘untagged’ and schools can use it on anything other than capital expenditure. Payment of State Recurrent Grants is based on annual enrolment data provided by schools to the Australian Government Department of Education and Training. Total funding in 2014 was around $643 million, of which $597 million was paid as a recurrent grant.

The audit will assess whether the Department of Education and Training, non-government schools and their system administrators are effectively and efficiently managing and using grants.

The report is expected to be tabled in March 2016.

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Bullying and Harassment in the Health Sector

Workplace bullying and harassment are perpetrated by workers and managers and affect mental and physical health and wellbeing. They can result in absenteeism, reduced productivity and healthcare workers leaving the profession. They also have the potential to create risks for patient safety. Studies show that bullying in the health sector is generally associated with the social organisation of work, including issues of hierarchy, resourcing and leadership, and is often not reported out of fear of retribution.

This audit will determine whether public health services are effectively managing the risk of bullying and harassment in the workplace.

The report is expected to be tabled in March 2016.

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Patient Safety in Victorian Hospitals

Clinical incidents in healthcare settings cause, or have the potential to cause, unexpected harm to patients. They include falls, pressure sores and medication errors and may result in near misses, adverse events where harm has occurred or sentinel events resulting in serious harm or death. It has been estimated that around one in 10 hospitalised patients suffers preventable harm and an adverse event related to care. The number of near misses, the accuracy of reporting of patient safety incidents, and the effectiveness of subsequent investigation are not known. The audit will determine whether public hospitals are managing risks to patient safety.

The report is expected to be tabled in March 2016.

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Local Government Service Delivery: Recreational Services

Councils continue to face resource constraints and sustainability issues, particularly smaller councils. State-wide council community satisfaction surveys report recreational facilities as a high priority for communities. Efficient and effective delivery of recreational facilities and activities requires councils to balance service delivery with increasing community expectations around quality, standards of governance, reduced costs, enhanced efficiencies and value for money.

The objective of this audit is to assess the effectiveness of local government service delivery with a focus on recreational activities and facilities. The audit will examine identification of needs, establishment of service levels and standards, and whether specific recreational services are delivered efficiently and economically to achieve intended community outcomes.

The audit is expected to be tabled in March 2016.

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Digital Dashboard: Status Review of ICT Projects and Initiatives Phase 2

In April 2015, VAGO tabled phase 1 of this audit report which highlighted Victorian public sector agencies' and entities' ICT expenditure as well as time, cost, and governance information for their ICT projects.

This phase 2 audit aims to determine whether Victorian public sector agencies and entities are appropriately planning, managing and implementing selected ICT projects in terms of time, cost, benefits realisation and governance.

The audit is expected to be tabled in March 2016.

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Reducing the Burden of Red Tape

Red tape can be broadly defined as an unnecessary bureaucracy that imposes costs on businesses. It is considered to be a constraint on economic activity, and successive Victorian governments have implemented initiatives to reduce it to improve conditions for Victorian businesses. Effective red tape reduction must strike a challenging balance between reducing the burden imposed on business while not detracting from the achievement of regulatory outcomes.

This audit will examine whether red tape reduction initiatives have been effective in reducing the costs imposed on business while achieving regulatory objectives.

The report is expected to be tabled in April 2016.

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Managing and Reporting on the Performance and Cost of Capital Projects

The scale and complexity of capital projects in the state budget mean that successful delivery represents a major challenge for public sector agencies. Project scope and cost blowouts can significantly impact the state’s finances and preclude investment in other worthy projects. Failure to deliver these projects effectively and/or to realise their intended benefits may significantly affect the state’s liveability and prosperity.

The objective of the audit is to provide a status review of current capital projects across the public sector by examining how effectively agencies manage the time, cost, scope, development and delivery of major capital projects

The report is expected to be tabled in April 2016.

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